Posts Tagged ‘william dawes’

LIEUTENANT WILLIAM DAWES & ‘THE ETERNAL FLAME’

Wednesday, September 6th, 2017

‘English clockmaker John Harrison, a mechanical genius who pioneered the science of portable precision timekeeping…invented a clock that would carry the true time from the home port, like an eternal flame, to any remote corner of the world’. Dava Sobel, Longitude, Fourth Estate, 1998

1788 – 24 January, Warranne: When the ‘eternal flame’ arrived aboard HMS Supply at ‘a remote corner of the world’ – Sydney Cove now –  on 24 January, 1788 it was accompanied by the discord that attended its birth. See: Captain Cook, John Harrison, Charles Green – Three Yorkshire-men  Walked  into a Bar

Initially that discord was played out at Greenwich Observatory between John Flamsteed, Britain’s first Astronomer Royal and Edmond Halley, who would succeed Flamsteed.

During Flamsteed’s long tenure 1675-1720 Halley, with the connivance of Isaac Newton, purloined, plagiarised and published Flamsteed’s work without his permission.

Their antics however paled into insignificance when compared to those of Nevil Maskelyne fifth Astronomer Royal from 1765 to 1811, who fought a pitched battle against John Harrison and his invention the clock that ‘wrested the world’s whereabouts from the stars, and locked the secret in a pocket watch’. Sobel. ibid.

Governor Arthur Phillip RN saw fit to continue that war. His target Marine Lieutenant William Dawes and his devotion to both God and the ‘pocket watch’. See: Malicious Maskelyne

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A TETHERED GOAT – JOHN McENTIRE- 10 DECEMBER 1790

Wednesday, August 30th, 2017

‘Military and police raids against dissenting Aboriginal groups lasted from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries. These raids had commenced by December 1790. Professor Bruce Kercher, An Unruly Child, A History of Law in Australia, Allen and Unwin, 1995

1790 – 13 December, Sydney: Governor Phillip summoned Marine Captain Watkin Tench attend him at Headquarters on 13 December 1790.

He issued Tench orders to march for Botany Bay at ‘day-light to-morrow morning…to put to death ten[10] we were to cut off, and bring in the heads of the slain,  for which purpose, hatchets and bags would be provided [and] if practicable, bring away two [2] natives as prisoners.

I [Phillip] am resolved to execute the prisoners who may be brought in, in the most public and exemplary manner, in the presence of as many of their countrymen as can be collected’. Captain Watkin Tench, Sydney’s First Four Years, ed. F.L. Fitzhardinge, Angus and Robertson, 1961

1790 – 14 December: Tench’s party consisted of; ‘two [2] captains, two [2] subalterns, and forty [40] privates, with a proper number of non-commissioned officers’.

Phillip’s claim that he ordered the raid in response to an ‘unprovoked’ wounding of convict John McEntire by the warrior Pemulway at Botany Bay on 10th December 1790 was spurious.

It does not take a military strategist to smell a rat; take off the heat – diversion – emphasise an enemy and give the guys with the guns something to do. See: Machiavellian Macarthur

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