Posts Tagged ‘Wileemarin’

‘TERROR’ ARTHUR PHILLIP & JOHN MACARTHUR THE ELEPHANT IN THE ROOM

Wednesday, July 11th, 2018

During Lord Sydney’s time as secretary of state, the Home Office was a clearing house. Its jurisdiction included overseeing of naval officers involved in trade regulation, secret service and special projects. As a result, Sydney crossed paths with three men who left their mark on history – Horotio Nelson, William Bligh and Arthur Phillip. Andrew Tink, Life and Times of Tommy Townshend, 2001

All three (3) – Nelson Bligh Phillip – have links to the fate of Australia’s First Peoples.

Nelson tangentially; when Captain Trail master of the death ship Neptune a convict transport of ‘Britain’s Grim Armada’ – the ‘Second Fleet’ – appeared at the Old Bailey accused of the brutal mistreatment of convicts and murdering two (2) of Neptune’s crew, Nelson’s favourable character reference led to Trail’s acquittal. See: A Tale of Two Fleets

1790 – December, Botany Bay: Phillip directly; when in December 1790 he introduced ‘universal terror’. See: A Hatchet Job on the Bidgigal of Botany Bay

‘Bounty’ Bligh arrived in New South Wales in August 1806 to take up his commission as Britain’s fourth ‘autocratic’ naval governor. In 1808 Governor Bligh was seized and imprisoned by the military at the instigation of John Macarthur the ex-officer who put rum into the New South Wales ‘Rum’ Corps. See: Australia Day Rebellion 26 January 1808

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KIDNAPPED: MANLY – WHAT’S IN A NAME

Tuesday, December 20th, 2016

‘The Act of 1786 [Geo. III. c.59] for the Encouragement of the Southern Whale Fishery proved to be the foundation of an important industry…in the wake of whalers other British traders would follow.

The furtherance of this plan became one of the central objects of Lord Hawkesbury’s commercial policy’. Vincent T. Harlow, Vol. 2, Founding of the Second British Empire 1763-1793, Longmans, 1964

Governor Arthur Phillip knew that establishing land bases to support a ship-based whaling industry in the Southern and Indian oceans, known to be teeming with marine life, was prominent among the ambitions of Prime Minister Pitt and his ‘secretive inner circle’ of powerful politicians Lord Hawkesbury, Henry Dundas and Lord Mulgrave.

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