Posts Tagged ‘Wileemarin’

‘TERROR’ ARTHUR PHILLIP & JOHN MACARTHUR THE ELEPHANT IN THE ROOM

Wednesday, July 11th, 2018

During Lord Sydney’s time as secretary of state, the Home Office was a clearing house. Its jurisdiction included overseeing of naval officers involved in trade regulation, secret service and special projects. As a result, Sydney crossed paths with three men who left their mark on [Australia’s European] history – Horotio Nelson, William Bligh and Arthur Phillip. Andrew Tink, Life and Times of Tommy Townshend, 2001

Admiral Nelson tangentially, Governor Phillip and Governor Bligh profoundly, each have links to the fate of Australia’s First Peoples as does John ‘MacMafia’ Macarthur.

Nelson: It is believed Horotio Nelson’s favourable character reference led to the acquittal of Captain Donald Trail. Trail master of Neptune a convict transport of the second fleet ‘Britain’s Grim Armada’ appeared at the Old Bailey accused of the murder of two (2) of Neptune’s crew.

In addition of 424 male convicts embarked 147 died during the voyage, a further number died within weeks of arrival in Sydney. Many survivors debased by their brutal treatment, in a well recognised cascade, went on to inflict violence on others.  See: A Tale of Two Fleets

Phillip: In January 1788 Captain Arthur Phillip RN, master-spy, master-mariner, master-strategist pulled off ‘a special project’ for the Home Office. He beat France to the punch in the race for New Holland.

‘There would be ‘some justification for the saying that England won Australia by six days’. Edward Jenks, History of Australian Colonies, cited Hugh E. Egerton, British Colonial Policy, Metheun, 1928

Macarthur: Lieutenant John Macarthur a junior officer of the New South Wales Infantry Corps arrived in Sydney in June 1790 aboard Scarborough, one (1) of three (3) death ships of ‘Britain’s Grim Armada.

‘Macarthur’s haughty quarrelsome nature which manifested itself on the voyage was to provoke much more conflict after his arrival in New South Wales in June 1790’. Michael Flynn, The Second Fleet, Britain’s Grim Armada of 1790, Library of Australian History, Sydney 1993

Bligh: In August 1806 Captain William ‘Bounty’ Bligh RN arrived to take up his commission as Britain’s fourth ‘autocratic naval governor’ of New South Wales.

On 26 January 1808, at the instigation John Macarthur, by then an ex-officer of the Corps, Major George Johnson the Corps commander seized and imprisoned Governor William Bligh RN. See: Australia Day Rebellion 26 January 1808


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KIDNAPPED: MANLY – WHAT’S IN A NAME

Tuesday, December 20th, 2016

‘The Act of 1786 [Geo. III. c.59] for the Encouragement of the Southern Whale Fishery proved to be the foundation of an important industry…in the wake of whalers other British traders would follow.

The furtherance of this plan became one of the central objects of Lord Hawkesbury’s commercial policy’. Vincent T. Harlow, Vol. 2, Founding of the Second British Empire 1763-1793, Longmans, 1964

Governor Arthur Phillip knew establishing land bases, to support a ship-based whaling industry in the Southern and Indian oceans, known to be teeming with marine life, was prominent among the many ambitions Prime Minister William Pitt and his ‘secretive inner circle’ of powerful politicians Lord Hawkesbury, Henry Dundas and Lord Mulgrave had for New Holland.

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