Posts Tagged ‘Wileemarin’

Previously ‘Terror’ Now -ARTHUR PHILLIP & JOHN MACARTHUR ‘A MAN WHO MADE ENEMIES’

Wednesday, July 11th, 2018

During Lord Sydney’s time as secretary of state, the Home Office was a clearing house. Its jurisdiction included overseeing of naval officers involved in trade regulation, secret service and special projects. As a result, Sydney crossed paths with three men who left their mark on [Australia’s European] history – Horotio Nelson, William Bligh and Arthur Phillip. Andrew Tink, Life and Times of Tommy Townshend, 2001

Horatio Nelson, William Bligh, Arthur Phillip, each are linked to the suffering and degradation experienced by Australia’s First Peoples following Britain’s invasion of New Holland, now Australia.

Lieutenant John ‘MacMafia’ Macarthur of the New South Corps can be added to the list of those who left an indelible ‘mark” on Australia’s modern history.

‘Macarthur’s haughty quarrelsome nature which manifested itself on the [second fleet] voyage was to provoke much more conflict after his arrival in New South Wales in June 1790’. Michael Flynn, The Second Fleet, Britain’s Grim Armada of 1790, Library of Australian History, Sydney 1993

Macarthur’s ‘conflict’ sprang purely from self-interest. His ‘private benefit’ threatened to bring to nought Whitehall’s ambitious future plans for  special project, trade, secret service’ in the southern oceans.  See Proximity Not Distance Drove Britain’s Invasion of New Holland. See: A Tale of Two Fleets

‘John Macarthur, a central figure in the military ‘mafia’ which quickly established itself as Australia’s first governing and property elite’.  Nigel Rigby, Peter Van Der Merwe, Glyn Williams, Pacific Explorations, National Maritime Museum Greenwich, Adlard Coles. Bloomsbury,  2018  

The Southern Oceans had the potential to be a blockade-breaker in time of war. Just as importantly the route opened up a long-sought opportunity for the Royal Navy to attack and loot Spain’s Central and South American Pacific Ocean ‘treasure’ colonies.

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KIDNAPPED: MANLY – WHAT’S IN A NAME

Tuesday, December 20th, 2016

‘The Act of 1786 [Geo. III. c.59] for the Encouragement of the Southern Whale Fishery proved to be the foundation of an important industry…in the wake of whalers other British traders would follow.

The furtherance of this plan became one of the central objects of Lord Hawkesbury’s commercial policy’. Vincent T. Harlow, Vol. 2, Founding of the Second British Empire 1763-1793, Longmans, 1964

Governor Arthur Phillip knew establishing land bases, to support a ship-based whaling industry in the Southern and Indian oceans, known to be teeming with marine life, was prominent among the many ambitions Prime Minister William Pitt and his ‘secretive inner circle’ of powerful politicians Lord Hawkesbury, Henry Dundas and Lord Mulgrave had for New Holland.

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