Posts Tagged ‘stavation’

JOSEPH JEFFERIES – FROM NEW YORK TO RIO AND OLD SYDNEY TOWN: ONE – THEN THERE WAS NONE

Monday, November 14th, 2016

1789 – April, Sydney: ‘Not one case of the disorder occurred among the white people either afloat or on shore although there were several children in the settlement; but a North American Indian…took the disease and died’. Samuel Bennett, Australian Discovery and Colonisation, Vol. 1 to 1800, Facsimile edition, 1981

Smallpox inoculation, using either pus or dried scab-matter was widespread in the British army of the eighteenth century. It served a dual purpose; to protect – to destroy.

‘It is true our surgeons had brought out variolous matter in bottles’. Marine Watkin Tench, Sydney’s First Four Years, ed. F.L. Fitzhardinge, Angus and Robertson, 1961

1787 – August, Brazil: When in August – September that year the ‘First Fleet’ en-route to Botany Bay put into Rio de Janeiro for supplies in Joseph Jefferies joined the crew of HMS Supply.

A North American Indian Jefferies was born on New York’s Staten Island.  In July 1776 Admiral Richard Howe RN commander of the Royal Navy’s ‘North American Station’ arrived there.

It is said during America’s Revolutionary War of Independence (1775-1783)  ‘the largest fleet in British naval history’ just on four hundred (400) ships were docked at Staten Island.

1789 – April, Sydney: ‘A smallpox epidemic struck the Aboriginal population around Sydney. Inexplicably the epidemic did not affect the Europeans, but [Governor] Phillip estimated that it resulted in the death of 50% of the local Aboriginal community’. People of Australia, Macquarie Series, Ed. Bryce Fraser, 1998.

The young adventurer Joseph Jefferies died of smallpox at Sydney on or about the 10th of May 1789.

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