Posts Tagged ‘Phillip Gidley King’

MISSING IN ACTION – HMS SIRIUS & HMS SUPPLY

Tuesday, March 21st, 2017

‘Dismay was painted on every countenance, when the tidings were proclaimed at Sydney’. Marine Captain Watkin, Sydney’s First Four Years, ed. F.L, Fitzhardinge, Angus and Robertson, 1961

1790 – March 19, Sydney: ‘the tidings’; loss of HMS Sirius the ‘First Fleet’s flagship – ‘dismay’ all hope of a China rescue  gone.

Norfolk Island: Sirius was at the bottom of the sea off Norfolk Island and her crew, one hundred and sixty naval (160) personnel, now stranded along with 50% of the white population evacuated from Sydney to save them from imminent starvat1on.

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THE IRISH & THE ENGLISH KING IN AUSTRALIA

Tuesday, February 14th, 2017

‘In 1800 and 1801 many hundreds of Irish prisoners  arrived, pushing the percentage of Irish to more than one-third of those under sentence and one-quarter of the white population. Governor King nervously estimated that more than half of the recent arrivals were Catholic ‘Defenders’, summarily transported  for their part in the massive Irish rebellion of 1798′. Marian Quartly, Creating a Nation 1788-1990, Chapter 2, 1990

1800 – September, Sydney: Governor Phillip Gidley King RN, on the departure of Governor John Hunter RN, took up his commission as Britain’s third naval Governor of Australia in September 1800.

King found himself juggling many balls; an unruly soldiery, a tsunami of grog, French colonial ambition and a simmering Irish rebellion. The Irish, many sentenced to death following the uprisings of 1798 on home soil, and reprieved death on condition of transportation to Australia, appeared to pose the most immediate threat.

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ALICE – DOWN THE RABBIT HOLE WITH KING

Tuesday, February 14th, 2017

‘A knowledge of the position of the military and their immediate friends occupied from 1792-1810, affords a key to the whole history of the colony; and without this knowledge many important transactions, affecting the civil, social and political  interests of the community would appear almost incomprehensible’. Samuel Bennett,Australian Discovery and Colonisation, Vol. 1 to 1800.

1800 – 15 April, Sydney: Phillip Gidley King RN, Britain’s third naval governor of Australia, arrived in the colony aboard HMS Speedy in the middle of April 1800.

Lieutenant Gidley King delivered Captain John Hunter RN, the incumbent Governor of New South Wales, a Home Office dispatch dated 5 November 1799 that; ‘severely censured Hunter and ordered him to return to England by the first safe conveyance’.

Tragically for the colony and Australia’s First Peoples, London could not have devised a more destabilising arrangement than Phillip Gidley King’s ambiguous appointment. It was an ‘Anomalous… dormant commission’  to became effective only if Governor Hunter died or was absent from the colony.  

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MACHIAVELLIAN MACARTHUR

Wednesday, February 1st, 2017

1790: ‘On 14 December [1790] a troop of over 50 men departed for Botany Bay armed with muskets, hatchets for beheading and bags for carrying the heads. Michael Pembroke, Arthur Phillip Sailor Mercenary Spy Governor, Hardie Grant Books, 2013

Governor Phillip’s orders of 14 December 1790 ‘differing in no respect from the last’ were repeated on 22 December 1790 with the same intent ‘catch, kill, behead‘ – a diversion. See: Arthur’s Algorithm

Marine Captain Watkin Tench to whom the orders were given, tells of Governor Phillip’s ‘fixed determination to repeat [them] whenever any future breach of good conduct on their [Aborigines’] part render it necessary’ they served as a template for; ‘twenty-five regiments of British infantry’ who served in Australia between June 1790 and September 1870. 

1792 – 12 December, Sydney: Governor Arthur Phillip RN, after five (5) traumatic years as Britain’s first Governor of New South Wales and repeated requests for repatriation, sailed home to England in the Atlantic on 12 December 1792. See: M’Entire – Death of a Sure Thing 

London failed to commission an immediate successor. 

1794 – February 6 London: ‘His [Hunter’s] commission as captain-general and governor-in-chief was dated 6 February 1794 [he] did not sail until 25 February 1795′.

1795 – September 7, Sydney: ‘[Hunter] arrived 7 September 1795 and assumed office four days later. For the length of the interregnum the British government was greatly at fault.’ Hunter, J.J. Auchmuty, Australian Dictionary of Biography

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ARTHUR PHILLIP AND “RULE 303”

Tuesday, June 30th, 2015

‘Twenty-five regiments of British infantry…fought in one of the most prolonged wars in the history of the British empire and for the first half of their stay were probably more frequently in action than the garrison of any other colony besides that of southern Africa’. Dr Peter Stanley, The Remote Garrison, The British Army in Australia 1788-1870, Kangaroo Press, 1986

Did Britain invade New Holland?

1889 – April 3, United Kingdom: Judicial Committee of the Privy Council; Lord Watson, Lord Fitzgerald, Lord Hobhouse, Lord MacNaghton, Sir William Grove, Cooper V Stuart [1889] 14 AC ruled; ‘it [New South Wales] was peacefully annexed to the British Dominion’.

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