Posts Tagged ‘john mcentire’

SWORD AND WORD BOTH ARE MIGHTY – GOVERNOR ARTHUR PHILLIP’S MILITARY CAMPAIGN FOR KING AND COUNTRY

Wednesday, July 11th, 2018

1790 – 13 December, Headquarters:‘ Put to death ten…bring in the heads of the slain…bring in two prisoners…I am resolved to execute the prisoners…in the most public and exemplary manner, in the presence of as many of their countrymen as can be collected’. Governor Phillip, General Orders to Captain Tench, cited, Marine Captain Watkin Tench, Sydney’s First Four Years, ed. F.L. Fitzhardinge, Angus and Robertson, Sydney, 1961

The reason Phillip gave for these ‘indiscriminate and disproportionate’ orders that put no limit on barbarity, was the spearing of convict John M’Entire by the warrior Pemulwuy that took place at Botany Bay in the early hours of 10 December 1790.

‘On the 9th of the month, a serjeant of marines, with three [3] convicts, among whom was M’Entire, the governor’s game-keeper (the person of whom Baneelon had, on former occasions, shewn so much dread and hatred) went out on a shooting party’. Tench. ibid.

Ostensibly the December raid was centred on Pemulwuy’s spearing of John M’Entire but all was not as it seemed. Bennalong, source of Phillip’s ‘dread and hatred’ intelligence, had been kidnapped in December 1789 and held captive within British lines untilĀ  he escaped in May 1790. See: Kidnapped – Manly What’s In A Name

‘But in this business of M’Entire I [Phillip] am fully persuaded that they [Aborigines] were unprovoked’. The ‘but’ references Phillip’s ‘own spearing’ by Wileemarrin on Manly Beach three (3) months previously – September 1790. See: Manly, Location Location Location

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‘TERROR’ ARTHUR PHILLIP & JOHN MACARTHUR THE ELEPHANT IN THE ROOM

Wednesday, July 11th, 2018

During Lord Sydney’s time as secretary of state, the Home Office was a clearing house. Its jurisdiction included overseeing of naval officers involved in trade regulation, secret service and special projects. As a result, Sydney crossed paths with three men who left their mark on history – Horotio Nelson, William Bligh and Arthur Phillip. Andrew Tink, Life and Times of Tommy Townshend, 2001

All three (3) – Nelson Bligh Phillip – have links to the fate of Australia’s First Peoples.

Nelson tangentially; when Captain Trail master of the second fleet death ship Neptune a convict transport of ‘Britain’s Grim Armada’ – the appeared at the Old Bailey accused of the brutal mistreatment of convicts and murdering two (2) of Neptune’s crew, it is thought Nelson’s favourable character reference led to Trail’s acquittal. See: A Tale of Two Fleets

1790 – December, Botany Bay: Phillip directly; when in December 1790 he introduced ‘universal terror’. See: A Hatchet Job – Kill 10 & Cut Off Their Heads

‘Bounty’ Bligh arrived in New South Wales in August 1806 and took up his commission as Britain’s fourth ‘autocratic’ naval governor. In 1808 Governor William Bligh RN was seized and imprisoned by the military at the instigation of John Macarthur the ex-officer who put rum into the New South Wales ‘Rum’ Corps. See: Australia Day Rebellion 26 January 1808

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A TETHERED GOAT – JOHN McENTIRE- 10 DECEMBER 1790

Wednesday, August 30th, 2017

‘Military and police raids against dissenting Aboriginal groups lasted from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries. These raids had commenced by December 1790. Professor Bruce Kercher, An Unruly Child, A History of Law in Australia, Allen and Unwin, 1995

1790 – 13 December, Sydney: Governor Phillip summoned Marine Captain Watkin Tench to ‘Headquarters’ on 13 December 1790.

Tench was to march for Botany Bay at ‘day-light to-morrow morning…to put to death ten[10] we were to cut off, and bring in the heads of the slain, for which purpose, hatchets and bags would be provided [and] if practicable, bring away two [2] natives as prisoners.

I [Phillip] am resolved to execute the prisoners who may be brought in, in the most public and exemplary manner, in the presence of as many of their countrymen as can be collected’. Captain Watkin Tench, Sydney’s First Four Years, ed. F.L. Fitzhardinge, Angus and Robertson, 1961

1790 – 14 December, Botany Bay: Tench’s party consisted of; ‘two [2] captains, two [2] subalterns, and forty [40] privates, with a proper number of non-commissioned officers’.

‘From the aversion uniformly shown by all the natives to this unhappy man he [McEntire] had long been suspected of having, in his excursions, shot and injured them’. Professor G. A. Wood, Lieutenant William Dawes and Captain Watkin Tench, Royal Australian Historical Society Journal, Vol. 10, Part 1, 1924

In light of this evidence, Phillip’s claim that he ordered the raid in response to Pemulway’s ‘unprovoked’ spearing of McEntire his own game-keeper, was spurious and it does not take a military strategist to smell a rat. Take off the heat, emphasise a common enemy, give the hungry, angry, scared, bored guys with the guns something to do. See: Machiavellian Macarthur

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