Archive for the ‘Intent’ Category

ARTHUR PHILLIP AND “RULE 303”

Tuesday, June 30th, 2015

‘Twenty-five regiments of British infantry…fought in one of the most prolonged wars in the history of the British empire and for the first half of their stay were probably more frequently in action than the garrison of any other colony besides that of southern Africa’. Dr Peter Stanley, The Remote Garrison, The British Army in Australia 1788-1870, Kangaroo Press, 1986

Did Britain invade New Holland?

1889 – April 3, United Kingdom: Judicial Committee of the Privy Council; Lord Watson, Lord Fitzgerald, Lord Hobhouse, Lord MacNaghton, Sir William Grove, Cooper V Stuart [1889] 14 AC ruled; ‘it [New South Wales] was peacefully annexed to the British Dominion’.

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INVASION 1788 – ‘ENGLAND WON AUSTRALIA BY SIX DAYS’ BUT ‘NOT A HINT OF IT SHALL EVER TRANSPIRE’ NT OF IT SHALL EVER TRANSPIRE’

Tuesday, December 2nd, 2014

‘Once again it was [Captain James] Cook’s fate to bring disaster in his wake’. Allan Moorehead, The Fatal Impact, Penguin, 1971

Britain invaded New Holland but; ‘not a hint of it shall ever transpire’.

‘It seems clear that only a few men in the inner circle of [Younger Pitt’s] government knew the exact purposes of the [Botany Bay] settlement; Eden [William Eden later Lord Auckland] was probably not in that secretive circle’. Professor Geoffrey Blainey, Gotham City, The Founding of Australia, The Arguments about Australia’s origins. Ed. Ged Martin, Hale and Iremonger, 1978

Prime Minster William Pitt’s ‘secretive circle’, Lord Hawkesbury, Lord Mulgrave and Henry Dundas, men Australia commemorates and whose names are familiar to Sydney-siders.

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A TALE OF TWO CITIES: 1759 QUEBEC, NEW FRANCE & 1788 SYDNEY, NEW HOLLAND – CAPTAIN JAMES C00K AND LOUIS ANTIONE DE BOUGAINVILLE

Sunday, September 21st, 2014

[Elder] Pitt’s  [Seven Years’s] war strategy set the pattern of colonisation for the next one hundred years’. Vanessa Collingridge, Captain Cook, Ebury Press, 2003.

1788 – Australia: Britain’s invasion of New Holland, now Australia, must be seen in context of Pitt the Elder’s ‘war strategy’.  In reality the ‘pattern set’ was not that of colonisation but of its precursor; ‘one hundred years’ of conquest 1763 – 1868.

‘The decision to colonise New South Wales cannot be isolated from the strategic imperatives of the world’s first truly global struggle, the Seven Years’ War (1757-63)’.  Jeffrey Grey, A Military History of Australia, Third Ed. Cambridge University Press, 2008

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SHOCK AND AWE – ‘INFUSE UNIVERSAL TERROR’

Saturday, September 20th, 2014

1790  DECEMBER – BOTANY  BAY

1790 – 12 December, head quarters Sydney: ‘The governor pitched upon me [Tench] to execute the…command…those natives who reside  near the head of Botany Bay….put ten [10] to death…bring in the heads of the slain [and] two [2] prisoners to  execute in the most most public and exemplary manner’. His Excellency Governor Arthur Phillip Orders to Marine Captain Watkin Tench, Sydney’s First Four Years, ed. F.L Fitzhardinge, Angus and Robertson, 1961

Can we know what drove Governor Arthur Phillip’s ferocity? Yes we can – SIMMERING REBELLION

See: An Ugly War: Britain Versus The Other

‘Phillip was authorised to see to the defence of the colony’. Professor Bruce Kercher, An Unruly Child, History of Law in Australia, Allen and Unwin, 1998

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ASLEEP IN THE DEEP – MERCHANT MEN OF THE FIRST FLEET

Sunday, October 25th, 2009

‘By Alexander, under care of Lieutenant Shortland, agent for the transports, I have sent dispatches to the Right Honourable the Lord Sydney and yourself, with a rough survey of Port Jackson….Lieutenant Shortland is likewise charged with a box of letters from Monsieur La Perouse for the French Ambassador’. Governor Phillip to Under-Secretary Nepean, July 10th 1788.

1787 – 13 May, Portsmouth England: A flotilla of eleven (11) ships commanded by Captain Arthur Phillip RN, known in Britain and Australia as the ‘First Fleet’ with a complement of approximately 1500 souls (one-half convicted criminals), set sail from Portsmouth on a voyage of 13,00 miles (21,000 km) to Botany Bay, New Holland on the 13th May 1787.

Two (2) warships HMS Sirius and HMS Supply carried two hundred (200) Royal Naval personnel. Twenty (20) officials and two hundred and forty-five (245) marines, guarding seven hundred and fifty (750) convicted criminals, were distributed throughout nine (9) chartered vessels.

‘New Holland is a good blind, then, when we want to add to the military strength of India’. Historical Records of New South Wales. Anon.

The mission of this large naval expedition, fully funded by government, was to invade, conqueror and claim sovereignty over the entire east coast of New Holland in order to gain supremacy over alternate trade and logistical sea-routes to and from India and China via the southern oceans.

Merchant ships were crewed to a formula related to tonnage; eight (8) seamen and one (1) boy per one hundred (100) ton. With specialist warrant officers, the number of crew on the fleet’s nine (9) chartered vessels, would have numbered approximately four hundred and forty (440).

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