Archive for the ‘Criminals – Australia’s Founding Fathers’ Category

CONVICT TRANSPORTATION – THE HULKS ACT & HOW THE MIND-SET OF SLAVERY CAME TO AUSTRALIA

Tuesday, November 8th, 2016

‘Transportation marked a profound transition in the history of British criminal justice’. Roger Ekirch, Bound for America: The Transportation of British Convicts to America 1718-1775, Clarendon Paperbacks, 1990

1603 – England: Following the death of childless Elizabeth Tudor in 1603 her second cousin, King James VI of Scotland, inherited the English Crown and reigned as James I of England and Scotland from 1603 to 1625.

‘Slavery as punishment…a king or magistrate could mercifully spare and enslave a man whose crime had forfeited his right to life’. Winthrop D. Jordan, White Over Black, 1550-1812, Pelican Books 1969  

James the First deemed transportation ‘out of the realm’ for those reprieved death as ‘tempering justice with mercy’. 

‘The strict legality of these measures may be questioned as Blackstone plainly states that no power on earth, except the authority of Parliament, could lawfully send a criminal out of England against his will’. Blackstone Commentaries; adapted by Kerr, 1862, cited in Wilfrid Oldham, Britain’s Convicts to the Colonies, Library of Australian History, 1990

Nevertheless under the auspices of James I an already existing irregular trade transporting convicts to America as slave labour flourished.

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BETRAYED – THOMAS BARRETT

Tuesday, September 13th, 2016

‘The arm of a large tree situated between the Tents of the Men and Women was fixt upon as a Gallowsthe body hung an hour and was then buried in a grave dug very near the Gallows’. Surgeon Bowes Smyth, Journal 1787-1789, Australian Documents Library, Sydney,1979

1788 – 27 February, Sydney Cove: Thomas Barrrett was the first man hanged in European Australia.

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BRITONS NEVER NEVER SHALL BE SLAVES !!!!

Tuesday, July 19th, 2016

A Time Line

Slavery as punishment… a king or magistrate could mercifully spare and enslave a man whose crime had forfeited his right to life. White Over Black — 1550-1812, Winthrop D. Jordan, 1969. 

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THE HULKS ACT 1776: TRANSPORTATION – AMERICA & AUSTRALIA – DIFFERENCES & SIMILARITIES

Thursday, May 29th, 2014

‘Slavery as punishment…a king or magistrate could mercifully spare and enslave a man whose crime had forfeited his right to life’. Winthrop D. Jordan, White Over Black, 1550 -1812, 1969

Following the death of Elizabeth Tudor, King James I of England (1603 – 1625), interpreted transportation ‘out of the realm’ as ‘tempering justice with mercy’.

‘Transportation marked a profound transition in the history of British criminal justice’. Roger Ekirch, Bound For America: The Transportation of British Convicts to America 1718-1775,  1981.

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PANDORA’S BOX & THE BOTANY BAY ESCAPEES

Wednesday, January 4th, 2012

On 17th March 1790, a small paragraph appeared in the Times announcing that William Bligh,  fresh from his remarkable voyage across the Pacific, was expected in London later that afternoon. He had arrived in Portsmouth three days earlier’. John Toohey, Captain Bligh’s Portable Nightmare, 1998

1790 –  March, Portsmouth: Captain William Bligh RN arrived in England on the 14th March 1790 eager to give testimony to the Admiralty of the infamous ‘Mutiny on the Bounty’.   (more…)

THE GREAT ESCAPE FROM SYDNEY COVE

Thursday, May 6th, 2010

1792 – March, Africa: ‘They [the Botany Bay escapees] had miscarried in a heroic struggle for liberty after having combated every hardship and conquered every difficulty’. Marine Captain Watkin Tench, Sydney’s First Four Years, ed. F.L. Fitzhardinge, Angus and Robertson, 1961.

1792 – March – Cape Town: Captain Tench, en-route from Sydney to England in HMS Gorgan with returning ‘First Fleet’ marines who had been stranded at Sydney Cove since January 1788 was astounded when, in March 1792, part of eleven (11) persons who escaped from Sydney sailed into Table Bay in a Dutch vessel as prisoners of Captain Edward Edwards RN commander of HMS Pandora.

The Admiralty had sent Edwards to Tahiti with order to round up and arrest the Bounty mutineers. See: HMS Gorgan and the Botany Bay Escapees

A year earlier – 28 March 1791 – convicts Mary and William Bryant baby Emanuel and Charlotte aged three (3), with seven (7) trusted companions, oars muffled on their stolen row-boat slipped silently through towering Sydney Heads out into the open sea and made for Timor.

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KETCH CONNECTION: THOMAS BARRETT SYDNEY 1788 – MICHAEL BARRETT LONDON 1868 – ROBERT RYAN MELBOURNE – 1967

Monday, July 13th, 2009

‘The death penalty was brought to Australia with the First Fleet’. Mike Richards, The Hanged Man, The Life and Death of Ronald Ryan, 2002.

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HMS GORGON & THE ‘BOTANY BAY ESCAPEES’

Friday, March 13th, 2009

‘I confess that I never looked at these people [the Botany Bay escapees] without pity and astonishment. They had miscarried in a Heroic struggle for liberty after having combated every hardship and conquered every difficulty’. Marine Captain Watkin Tench on HMS Gorgan at Cape Town, March 1792 – Sydney’s First Four Years, ed. F.L. Fitzhardinge, Angus and Robertson 1961

1791 – 28 March, Sydney Cove: Ironically the hustle and bustle surrounding HMS Gorgan’s arrival at Sydney (15 March 1791) helped divert attention as, at midnight on 28 March 1791 with oars muffled on their stolen boat – Governor Phillip’s cutter –  convicts William and Mary Bryant, their children Charlotte three (3) years and baby Emanuel with seven (7) convict companions, slipped silently out of Sydney Harbour and set course for Timor.

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