Archive for the ‘Conflict’ Category

MANLY – LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION

Tuesday, December 6th, 2016

1790 – September, Manly Beach: ‘A native with a spear in his hand came forward…His excellency held out hand…advancing towards him…the nearer, the governor approached, the greater became the terror and agitation of the Indian.

To remove his fear, governor Phillip threw down a dirk, he wore at his side…the other [Wileemarin] alarmed at the rattle of the dirk, and probably  misconstruing the action, instantly fixed his lance, aimed his lance with such force and dexterity striking the governor’s right shoulder, just above the collar bone’.  Marine Watkin Tench, Sydney’s First Four Years, ed. F.L. Fitzhardinge, Angus and Robertson, 1961

The spearing of Governor Phillip must be seen in the context of kidnap, disease and death. Wileemarin had every reason to strike the advancing Governor. See: Kidnapped – Manly What’s in a Name 

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AN UGLY WAR – BRITAIN VERSUS ‘THE OTHER’

Tuesday, December 6th, 2016

‘Phillip was authorised to see to the defence of the colony…Military and police raids against dissenting Aboriginal groups lasted  from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries…These raids had commenced by December 1790′. Professor Bruce Kercher, History of Law in Australia, Allen and Unwin, 1995

2016 – September, Manly Beach:  FAKE NEWSROAD RAGE – violence broke out on both the Harbour and Spit Bridges when cars were caught in giant grid-lock as Sydney-siders rushed to Manly where a whale – as big as a bus – had beached on the sand.

1790 – September, Manly Beach: Real news – excited Aborigines and Englishmen rushed to Manly to marvel at, ‘a tremendous monster’ whale that had washed up at Manly. The stranding proved a tipping point in the near annihilation of a free people, Australia’s First Nations’ Peoples.

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AUSTRALIA DAY REBELLION – 26 JANUARY 1808.

Sunday, January 25th, 2009

‘You cannot overrate the solicitude of H.M. Government on the subject of the Aborigines of New Holland. It is impossible to contemplate the condition or the prospects of that unfortunate race without the deepest commiseration. Still it is impossible that H.M. Government should forget that the original aggression was ours’. Lord John Russell to Sir George Gipps, Dispatch, 21 December 1838, Historical Records of Australia, Series, Vol XX.

1808 – 26 January, Sydney: On the 20th anniversary of Britain’s ‘original aggression’, the invasion of New Holland and raising of the Union Jack at Sydney Cove by Governor Arthur Phillip RN on 26 January 1788, Major George Johnston, Commanding Officer of the New South Wales ‘Rum’ Corps, marched on Government House and arrested Governor William Bligh RN described as; ‘a man of sterner fibre’.

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