MANLY – LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION

December 6th, 2016

1790 – September, Manly Beach: ‘A native with a spear in his hand came forward…His excellency held out hand…advancing towards him…the nearer, the governor approached, the greater became the terror and agitation of the Indian.

To remove his fear, governor Phillip threw down a dirk, he wore at his side…the other [Wileemarin] alarmed at the rattle of the dirk, and probably  misconstruing the action, instantly fixed his lance, aimed his lance with such force and dexterity striking the governor’s right shoulder, just above the collar bone’.  Marine Watkin Tench, Sydney’s First Four Years, ed. F.L. Fitzhardinge, Angus and Robertson, 1961

The spearing of Governor Phillip must be seen in the context of kidnap, disease and death. Wileemarin had every reason to strike the advancing Governor. See: Kidnapped – Manly What’s in a Name (to be published soon)

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AN UGLY WAR: BRITAIN VERSUS THE OTHER

December 6th, 2016

‘Phillip was authorised to see to the defence of the colony. Military and police raids against dissenting Aboriginal groups lasted from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries. These raids had commenced by December 1790’. Professor Bruce Kercher, History of Law in Australia, Allen and Unwin, 1995

2016 – September, Manly Beach: Fake news – ROAD RAGE STABBING – Violence broke out on both Harbour and Spit Bridges when cars were caught in giant grid-lock as crowds rushed to Manly where a whale – as big as a bus – had beached itself on the sand.

1790 – September, Manly Beach: Real news –  A tremendous monster’ – a tipping point for the near destruction of a free people, Australia’s First Peoples, occurred in September 1790 when excited Aborigines and Englishmen rushed to Manly to marvel at a large whale stranded on the sand.  Read the rest of this entry »

JOSEPH JEFFERIES – FROM NEW YORK TO RIO AND OLD SYDNEY TOWN: ONE – THEN THERE WAS NONE

November 14th, 2016

1789 – April, Sydney: ‘Not one case of the disorder occurred among the white people either afloat or on shore although there were several children in the settlement; but a North American Indian…took the disease and died’. Samuel Bennett, Australian Discovery and Colonisation, Vol. 1 to 1800, Facsimile edition, 1981

Smallpox inoculation, using dried scab-matter was widespread in the British army of the eighteenth century. It served a dual purpose; to protect – to destroy.

‘It is true our surgeons had brought out variolous matter in bottles’. Marine Watkin Tench, Sydney’s First Four Years, ed. F.L. Fitzhardinge, Angus and Robertson, 1961

1787 – August, Brazil: When the First Fleet en-route to Botany Bay put into Rio de Janeiro for supplies in August 1787 Joseph Jefferies, a North American Indian born on New York’s Staten Island, joined the crew of HMS Supply. The young adventurer died of smallpox at Sydney on or about the 10th of May 1789. Read the rest of this entry »

BOSWELL GOES INTO BAT FOR THE BOTANY BAY ESCAPEES

November 8th, 2016

‘Boswell appeared for the defence, sometimes in well-nigh hopeless cases. He was never deterred, however, either by the poverty of his client, or by the weight of the evidence against him. On the contrary he seems to have been prone to espouse the causes of the more forlorn the more pertinaciously. C.H Currey, The Transportation Escape and Pardoning of Mary Bryant, Angus and Robertson, 1963.

 1792 – July, London: James Boswell appeared for the defence at the Old Bailey in a most extraordinary case. His clients, five convicts – known collectively as ‘the Botany Bay escapees’  – were Mary Bryant, William Allen, James Martin, Nathaniel Lilley and John Butcher.

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CONVICT TRANSPORTATION – THE HULKS ACT & HOW THE MIND-SET OF SLAVERY CAME TO AUSTRALIA

November 8th, 2016

‘Slavery as punishment…a king or magistrate could mercifully spare and enslave a man whose crime had forfeited his right to life’. Winthrop D. Jordan, White Over Black, 1550-1812, Pelican Books 1969  

Following the death of Elizabeth Tudor King James VI of Scotland, her second cousin, inherited the Crown and reigned as James I of England and Scotland from 1603 to 1625.

‘Transportation marked a profound transition in the history of British criminal justice’. Roger Ekirch, Bound for America: The Transportation of British Convicts to America 1718-1775, Clarendon Paperbacks, 1990

James I deemed exile ‘out of the realm’ for those reprieved death as ‘tempering justice with mercy’. Under the King’s auspices an existing irregular trade transporting to America flourished.

‘The strict legality of these measures may be questioned as Blackstone plainly states that no power on earth, except the authority of Parliament, could lawfully send a criminal out of England against his will’. Blackstone Commentaries; adapted by Kerr, 1862, cited in Wilfrid Oldham, Britain’s Convicts to the Colonies, Library of Australian History, 1990

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HMS GUARDIAN & JOSEPH BANK’S GARDEN

September 13th, 2016

1790 – 1 January, Sydney Cove: ‘On the shores of this vast ocean…on the summit of the hill [South Head], every morning from day-light until the sun sunk, did we sweep the horizon, in hope of seeing a sail. At every fleeting speck which arose from the bosom of the sea, the heart bounded, and the telescope was lifted to the eye. If a ship appeared here, we knew she must be bound for us’. Marine Watkin Tench, Sydney’s First Four Years, F.L Fitzhardinge, Angus and Robertson, 1961

Since January 1788 the Englishmen of ‘First Fleet’ had been marooned; ‘entirely cut off no communication whatever having passed with our native country since the 13th May, 1787, the day of our departure from Portsmouth… the misery and horror of such a situation cannot be imparted, even by those who have suffered under it’. Tench. op. cit.

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BETRAYED – THOMAS BARRETT

September 13th, 2016

‘The arm of a large tree situated between the Tents of the Men and Women was fixt upon as a Gallowsthe body hung an hour and was then buried in a grave dug very near the Gallows’. Surgeon Bowes Smyth, Journal 1787-1789, Australian Documents Library, Sydney,1979

1788 – 27 February, Sydney Cove: Thomas Barrrett was the first man hanged in European Australia.

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MACHIAVELLAN MACARTHUR POST GOVERNOR PHILLIP

July 29th, 2016

1792-1795: ‘For the length of the interregnum the British government was greatly at fault….His [Hunter’s] commission as captain-general and governor-in-chief was dated 6 February 1794 [he] did not sail until 25 February 1795…arrived [Sydney] 7 September 1795 and assumed office four days later’. J.J. Auchmuty, Hunter, Australian Dictionary of Biography

1792 – 12 December, Sydney: Governor Arthur Phillip RN, after repeated requests for repatriation, received approval to return to England and sailed for home in the Atlantic on 12 December 1792.

London failed to commission an immediate successor.

‘There are two kinds of error: those of commission, doing something that should not be done, and those of omission, not doing something that should be done. The latter are much more serious than, the former’. Kennneth Hooper and Willam Hopper, The Puritan Gift, Forward Professor Russell Lincoln Ackoff, I.B. Tauris, New York, 2009

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BRITONS NEVER NEVER SHALL BE SLAVES !!!!

July 19th, 2016

A Time Line

Slavery as punishment… a king or magistrate could mercifully spare and enslave a man whose crime had forfeited his right to life. White Over Black — 1550-1812, Winthrop D. Jordan, 1969. 

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CAPE YORK TO SOUTH CAPE – YOUR LAND IS MY LAND

July 19th, 2016

‘Discovery gave what was termed an inchoate title which could only be developed further by actual occupation’. Henry Reynolds, Aboriginal Sovereignty, Three Nations, One Australia, Allen and Unwin, 1996

1770 – 22 August, Cape York: In the name of King George III of England Lieutenant James Cook, without consent of its owners, claimed ‘discovery’ of the entire coast of New Holland from ‘Cape York in the most northern extremity…to South Cape’.

‘Hugh Grotius [1538-1645] remark[ed] that an act of discovery was sufficient to give clear title to sovereignty ‘only when it is accompanied by actual possession’. Reynolds. op.cit.

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